Urban Wildlife

Oktoberfest Celebration at Marineland Oct. 16th

Marineland's Dolphin Conservation Center will host an Oktoberfest celebration with live music, food, and beverages from 11 A.M. to 3 P.M. on Saturday, October 16th.  

Everyone is invited to enjoy the festivities in the newly christened Neptune Park, in which a 7 foot tall marble statue of Neptune occupies center stage. 

The local classic rock band known as "Kings Highway" will provide musical entertainment.  Woody's Bar-B-Q of Cobblestone Village in St. Augustine and JT's Seafood Shack of Palm Coast will be offering food from their menus. 

General admission to view the dolphins in their habitat will be half off regular prices throughout the day!  Bikers are welcome.
 
For information or reservations for interactive programs with dolphins, call (904) 471-1111 Extension 116 or visit www.marineland.net.

Stone Crab Season Opens Oct. 15

The commercial and recreational harvest season for stone crab claws in Florida opens on Oct. 15.  The season will remain open through May 15.

Stone crab claws must be at least 2 3/4 inches in length to be harvested legally, and claws may not be taken from egg-bearing female stone crabs.  Recreational harvesters are allowed to use up to five stone crab traps, and there is a daily bag limit of one gallon of claws per person or two gallons per vessel, whichever is less.

Click here for more information regarding the recreational harvest of stone crab claws.

Click here for commercial stone crab regulations and licensing information (click on "Fishing - Saltwater").

Animal Emergency Hospital of St. Johns Open House Oct. 9

Animal Emergency Hospital of St. Johns is having an open house on Oct 9th, from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Pony rides, silent auctions, give a ways, food, pet information, vaccines etc etc.

All proceeds go to the St. Augustine Hhumane Society. 2505 Old Moultrie Rd. St. Aug.

New Blood Perks Up Florida Panther Population

USA Today - By the early 1990s there were only 20 to 25 Florida panthers left out of what was once a large and thriving population – and those that remained were sickly and inbred, destined for extinction within 20 years, experts estimated. So in 1995 conservation managers moved eight wild-caught female pumas from Texas to the area – a reintroduction so successful that between 1995 and 2008 a total of 424 panther births have been documented.